Veni Vidi Vici? Using the TreeTagger on Latin Texts

“I think, yes, it’s also available with Latin texts,”  Ines Rehbein and  Josef Ruppenhofer answered during a lecture in one of our InFoDiTex sessions on my request. Immediately, I was electrified – to me this was a magic moment, because in most of the digital humanities conferences and summer schools, I learned to know powerful and valuable tools for English or German text corpora. Yet, my corpus covers a bundle of 252 Latin letters written by St. Augustine around the beginning of the 5th century CE. At least in my experience, useful tools for Latin texts are quite rare (I know there are many more possibilities with some skills in programming, but in this context, I’m thinking of hands-on tools for less technical researchers to start with). Continue reading “Veni Vidi Vici? Using the TreeTagger on Latin Texts”

If Kant used a computer… #DHd2018 (“Digital Humanities im Deutschsprachigen Raum”)

Immanuel Kant as a protagonist of the digital humanities? If you think this will never happen – well, then you have not heard from the  DHd2018 in Cologne, which took place from February 26th to March 2nd. The title of the conference “Kritik der digitalen Vernunft” was applied in many contributions from the initial keynote by Berlin’s professor of philosophy  Sybille Krämer to the closing keynote by  C. M. Sperberg-McQueen (whom you should know at least as one of the creators of XML and author of the  TEI Guidelines). Continue reading “If Kant used a computer… #DHd2018 (“Digital Humanities im Deutschsprachigen Raum”)”